Quality Matters

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is committed to serving our community by providing the highest quality of care for all of our patients. Quality of care is nationally recognized and measured in several ways.

  • Accreditation by the Joint Commission: The Joint Commission is a nonprofit organization which evaluates and accredits nearly 18,000 health care organizations in the United States. Hospitals voluntarily accredited by the Joint Commission are committed to upholding and meeting certain performance standards, set by nationally recognized non-profit healthcare quality organizations, such as National Quality Foundation and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. In order to maintain accreditation, hospitals undergo a voluntary, on-site survey performed by the Joint Commission every three years.
  • Patient Experience: Helping patients have excellent experiences means ensuring effective communication while providing patient-centered care that is responsive and respectful to patient preferences, needs, and values.
  • Timely & Effective Care: Research shows that the best results for patients with certain conditions can be achieved by following best practices as set by leaders in the healthcare industry. Measuring how often we follow these best practices helps us ensure that we are providing the highest quality of care.
  • National Hospital Rating System: Hospital Compare, a government run website, allows consumers to compare the quality of over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the United States, based on nationally recognized quality indicators. Consumers can see how hospitals are doing compared to National and State Averages in areas of:
    • Patient experience
    • Timely &amap; effective care,
    • Readmissions, complications, & death
    • Use of medical imaging,
    • Payment and value of care

To access Hospital Compare, go to www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/search.html.

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare measures quality data to help us to see where we are providing the best care and identify opportunities for improvement. When patients come to Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare Health System, they can be assured that maintaining the highest quality of care for all patients is our top priority.

Click a quality measure below to view how ValleyCare is performing.

Blood Clot Prevention and Treatment

What is a blood clot?

Blood clots, known as venous thromboembolism or VTE, can develop in patients who have to stay in bed for long periods of time at the hospital. These blood clots can sometimes break off and travel to other parts of the body, causing serious problems and sometimes even death. There are safe, effective, proven methods to prevent blood clots or treat them when they occur.

Quality Measurements

In early 1999, The Joint Commission, an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies health care organizations and programs in the United States, solicited input from a wide variety of health care experts about core measures for hospitals. Simultaneously, The Joint Commission worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to align the measure specifications. The goal is to improve the health care delivery process. The Joint Commission has been a nationally recognized leader in performance measurement since the mid-1980s.

The Joint Commission's standardized performance measure is considered the "gold standard" in health care today. The Joint Commission has successfully developed and nationally implemented many sets of standardized core performance measures for hospitals. The measure data is publicly reported on the Joint Commission's web site at Quality Check. One of these measure groups is blood clot treatment and prevention.

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Blood Clot Prevention and Treatment?

Blood clot prevention and treatment

These scores tell you the percent of patients who got each of the recommended and appropriate care* from the list below:

  • Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis—Patients who got treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after hospital admission or surgery
  • ICU Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis—Patients who got treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after being admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU)
  • VTE Pts with Anticoag Overlap Therapy—Patients with blood clots who got the recommended treatment, which includes using two different blood thinner medicines at the same time
  • VTE Pts Rec. Unfract'd Hep. With Dose/Ptt Ct Mntr by—Patients with blood clots who were treated with an intravenous blood thinner, and then were checked to determine if the blood thinner was putting the patient at an increased risk of bleeding
  • Venous Thromboembolism Discharge—Patients with blood clots who were discharged on a blood thinner medicine and received written instructions about that medicine

*Note: It may not be appropriate for every patient to receive each of these treatments.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job taking care of patients is to look at how well the hospital provides the care listed above. Higher numbers are better.

Breast Cancer

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts in the cells of the breast. A malignant tumor is a group of cancer cells that invades surrounding tissues and/or spreads "metastasizes" to distant areas of the body. The disease occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get it, too.

Symptoms of breast cancer vary from person to person. Some common breast cancer signs and symptoms include:

  • Skin changes, such as swelling, redness, or other visible differences in one or both breasts
  • An increase in size or change in shape of the breast(s)
  • Changes in the appearance of one or both nipples
  • Nipple discharge other than breast milk
  • General pain in/on any part of the breast
  • Lumps or nodes felt on or inside of the breast

Symptoms more specific to invasive breast cancer are as follows:

  • Irritated or itchy breasts
  • Change in breast color
  • Increase in breast size or shape (over a short period of time)
  • Changes in touch (may feel hard, tender or warm)
  • Peeling or flaking of the nipple skin
  • A breast lump or thickening
  • Redness or pitting of the breast skin (like the skin of an orange)

Quality Measurements

The quality of cancer programs is validated through quality watchdogs, such as the Commission on Cancer (COC), National Accreditation for Breast Centers (NAPBC), and American College of Radiology Breast Center of Excellence (ACR-BICOE). These accrediting agencies have identified best practices and standards of care based on cancer research. In order to receive accreditation, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare voluntarily participated in an onsite survey and evaluation of our practices and outcomes. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is proud to say that we have received accreditation from all three of these organizations.

American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer (COC): Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's cancer program has been accredited by the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer since 1992. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is among a select group of hospitals that have met strict clinical, education and cancer reporting requirements. Only 30% percent of the nation's hospitals have earned this recognized accreditation. This achievement is a benchmark of quality for cancer care, and Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare was granted a three-year approval. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare has devoted considerable resources to developing and maintaining a progressive cancer care program. https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer

National Accreditation for Breast Centers (NAPBC): Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's cancer program has been accredited by NAPBC since 2011. NAPBC-accreditation is granted only to those centers that have voluntarily committed to providing the best in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment and is able to comply with established NAPBC standards. Each center must undergo a rigorous evaluation and review of its performance and compliance with the NAPBC standards. To maintain accreditation, centers must undergo an on-site review every three (3) years. https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/napbc

American College of Radiology Breast Center of Excellence(ACR-BICOE): Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's Women's Imaging Center has been accredited by ACR for Breast Center of Excellence since 2011. The Breast Imaging Center of Excellence (BICOE) designation is awarded to breast imaging centers that achieve excellence by seeking and earning accreditation in all of the ACR's voluntary breast-imaging accreditation programs and modules, in addition to the mandatory Mammography Accreditation Program. http://www.acr.org/quality-safety/accreditation/bicoe

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's Multidisciplinary Breast Steering Committee is responsible and accountable for maintaining an exemplary breast center program for the benefit of patients with malignant and benign breast disease in accordance with the standards of accreditation. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is committed to providing our patients with patient-centered quality care close to home. The Committee reviews multiple quality measures, with the goal of exceeding national and local benchmarks. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare has met or exceeded every single national quality measure.

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment?

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's performance rate for diagnosing and treating patients with breast cancer gives you an idea of our overall performance compared to other cancer programs in California and all other cancer programs in the United States.

Completion time between diagnostic evaluations for mammography

  • Days from Abnormal Screening Mammography to Diagnostic Mammography—A shorter time between a screening mammogram and a diagnostic mammogram allows for a faster diagnosis.
  • Days from Diagnostic Mammography to Biopsy—A shorter time between a diagnostic mammogram and a biopsy allows for a faster diagnosis.

surgical treatment and biopsy rates for breast cancer

  • Breast Conserving Surgery Rate—National organizations recommend that a minimum of 50% of all Stage 0-II patients undergo breast conserving surgery. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare exceeds this benchmark. 96% of Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare patients undergo breast conserving surgery.
  • Sentinel Node Biopsy Surgical Identification—Successful identification of sentinel lymph nodes reduces axillary lymph node dissections, removal of lymph nodes in the armpit area. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare surgeons identified sentinel lymph nodes in 100% of our patients. National organizations recommend a minimum of 85% identification rates.

Radiation administered within 1 year of diagnosis for breast cancer

It is recommended that women under the age of 70, who receive breast conservative surgery for breast cancer, receive radiation treatment within one year of diagnosis. Since 2009, 100% of these Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare patients have received radiation within one year of diagnosis, which exceeds the California state average.

Combination chemotherapy considered within 4 months of diagnosis of breast cancer

It is recommended that women under the age of 70, with AJCC T1cNO, stage 1B-III hormone receptor negative breast cancer, be considered for or receive combination chemotherapy within four months of diagnosis. Since 2009, combination chemotherapy has been considered or administered to 100% of these Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare patients within four months of diagnosis, which exceeds the California state average.

Tamoxifen considered or administered within 1 year of diagnosis

It is recommended that women under the age of 70, with AJCC T1cNO, stage 1B-III hormone receptor positive breast cancer, be considered for or receive Tamoxifen or third generation aromotase inhibitor within one year of diagnosis. Since 2009, Tamoxifen or third generation aromotase inhibitor has been considered or administered to 100% of these Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare patients within one year of diagnosis, which exceeds the California state average.

Colorectal Cancer

What is colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer is a disease that starts in the colon or the rectum—parts of your body's digestive system. It is one of the most common cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Who gets colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer occurs most often in men and women who are older than 50. Others at higher than average risk for the disease include those with a family history of colorectal cancer or diets high in fat and calories and low in fiber.

Are there any symptoms?

The symptoms of colorectal cancer may vary from person to person. It's also possible to have colorectal cancer and no symptoms at all. But, if you have any of the following conditions, the NCI says you should check with your doctor:

  • A change in bowel habits—diarrhea, constipation or a feeling that your bowel does not empty completely
  • Rectal bleeding or blood in the stool
  • Abdominal pain, bloating, fullness or cramps
  • Weight loss with no known reason
  • Constant fatigue
  • Vomiting

These symptoms can also be caused by other conditions such as infections, hemorrhoids and inflammatory bowel disease.

How is the disease diagnosed?

To determine what is causing your symptoms and if you have colorectal cancer, your doctor may look at your medical history, perform a physical exam and order one or more tests. Those tests could include:

  • A blood test to look for anemia or to check your liver function.
  • A sigmoidoscopy—an examination of the rectum and lower colon using a lighted tool called a sigmoidoscope.
  • A colonoscopy—an examination of the rectum and entire colon using a lighted instrument called a colonoscope.
  • A virtual colonoscopy—a minimally invasive imaging examination of the entire colon and rectum.
  • A double-contrast barium enema—an enema with a barium solution followed by a series of x-rays of the colon and rectum.

Is colorectal cancer treatable?

Yes. But it's important to catch the disease early. The earlier colorectal cancer is detected, the easier it is to treat and the better your chances for a full recovery. For early stages of colorectal cancer, surgery may be all that is required. More advanced stages may require other treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Quality Measurements

The quality of cancer programs is validated through quality watchdogs, such as the Commission on Cancer (COC). These accrediting agencies have identified best practices and standards of care based on cancer research. In order to receive accreditation, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare voluntarily participated in an onsite survey and evaluation of our practices and outcomes. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is proud to say that we have received accreditation from this organization.

American College of Surgeons, Commission on Cancer (COC): Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare Health System's cancer program has been accredited by the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer since 1992. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is among a select group of hospitals that have met strict clinical, education and cancer reporting requirements. Only 30% percent of the nation's hospitals have earned this recognized accreditation. This achievement is a benchmark of quality for cancer care, and Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare was granted a three-year approval. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare Health System has devoted considerable resources to developing and maintaining a progressive cancer care program. https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's Multidisciplinary Cancer Committee is responsible and accountable for maintaining an exemplary cancer program for the benefit of patient with malignant colorectal cancer in accordance with the standards of accreditation. Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare Health System is committed to providing our patients with patient-centered quality care close to home. The Committee reviews multiple quality measures, with the goal of exceeding national and local benchmarks. As you will see below we have met or exceeded every single national quality measure.

How is Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare performing on Colorectal Cancer Treatment?

Chemotherapy considered or administered within 4 months of diagnosis

It is recommended that people under the age of 80, who have been diagnosed with AJCC stage III (lymph node positive cancer, be considered for or receive Colon-Adjuvant chemotherapy within four months of diagnosis. Since 2009, 100% of these Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare patients have received Colon-Adjuvant chemotherapy within four months of diagnosis, which exceeds the California state average.

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's performance gives you an idea of our overall performance compared to other cancer programs in California.

Influenza Vaccination

What is influenza ("flu")?

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the flu can cause severe illness and life-threatening complications in many people. On average, 5% to 20% of people in the United States get the flu and more than 200,000 are hospitalized from flu related complications. In some years, there have been as many as 49,000 deaths due to the flu or complications of the flu.

Why vaccinate against the flu?

Flu vaccines protect patients against the dominant strains of influenza (flu) viruses circulating during that flu season. Each year the flu virus changes slightly, so patients must get vaccinated each year in order to stay protected. The Joint Commission has partnered with The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Adult Immunization Task Force to improve vaccination rates in hospitalized patients.

Quality Measurements

In early 1999, The Joint Commission, an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies health care organizations and programs in the United States, solicited input from a wide variety of health care experts about core measures for hospitals. Simultaneously, The Joint Commission worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to align the measure specifications. The goal is to improve the health care delivery process. The Joint Commission has been a nationally recognized leader in performance measurement since the mid-1980s.

The Joint Commission's standardized performance measure is considered the "gold standard" in health care today. The Joint Commission has successfully developed and nationally implemented many sets of standardized core performance measures for hospitals. The measure data is publicly reported on the Joint Commission's web site at Quality Check. One of these measure groups is influenza immunization.

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Influenza Immunization?

Influenza Immunization

This score tells you the percent of all appropriate patients who received an immunization*.

*Note: It may not be appropriate for every patient to receive this treatment.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job taking care of patients is to look at how well the hospital provides influenza immunizations. Higher numbers are better.

Patient Experience

Patient Experience

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is committed to providing the highest quality of care and excellent service to our patients, their families and visitors. We measure patients' experiences through the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, which is part of the Accountable Care Act. The HCAHPS survey is a standardized survey instrument which asks patients to evaluate hospitals on eleven important quality topics.

Patients are able to respond by answering "never," "sometimes," "usually," or "always" to most of the survey questions. Hospitals that are rated well have higher percentages of patients who chose the most positive response option, such as "always," to the survey questions. The survey topics and questions are listed below.

Survey topic

Survey question

1) How often did nurses communicate well with patients?

During this hospital stay...

  • How often did nurses treat you with courtesy and respect?
  • How often did nurses listen carefully to you?
  • How often did nurses explain things in a way you could understand?

2) How often did doctors communicate well with patients?

During this hospital stay...

  • How often did doctors treat you with courtesy and respect?
  • How often did doctors listen carefully to you?
  • How often did doctors explain things in a way you could understand?

3) How often did patients receive help quickly from hospital staff?

During this hospital stay...

  • How often did you get help as soon as you wanted after you pressed the call button?
  • How often did you get help in getting to the bathroom or in using a bedpan as soon as you wanted?

4) How often was patients' pain well controlled?

During this hospital stay...

  • How often was your pain well controlled?
  • How often did the hospital staff do everything they could to help you with your pain?

5) How often did staff explain about medicines before giving them to patients?

Before giving you any new medicine...

  • How often did hospital staff tell you what the medicine was for?
  • How often did hospital staff describe possible side effects in a way you could understand?

6) How often were the patients' rooms and bathrooms kept clean?

During this hospital stay...

  • How often were your room and bathroom kept clean?

7) How often was the area around patients' rooms kept quiet at night?

During this hospital stay...

  • How often was the area around your room quiet at night?

8) Were patients given information about what to do during their recovery at home?

During this hospital stay...

  • Did hospital staff talk with you about whether you would have the help you needed when you left the hospital?
  • Did you get information in writing about what symptoms or health problems to look out for after you left the hospital?

9) How well did patients understand the type of care they would need after leaving the hospital?

During this hospital stay...

  • Did hospital staff consider your health care options and wishes when deciding what kind of care you would need after leaving the hospital?
  • Did you and/or your caregivers understand what you would have to do to take care of yourself after leaving the hospital?
  • Did you know what medications you would be taking and why you would be taking them after leaving the hospital?

10) How do patients rate the hospital overall?

What number would you use to rate this hospital during your stay?

11) Would patients recommend the hospital to friends and family?

Would you recommend this hospital to your friends and family?

How is Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare Performing on Patient Experience?

Here is how Stanford Health Care - ValleyCare is doing in each of these areas. For each of these measures, higher scores mean better patient experiences.

Communication with nurses

Communication with Doctors

Responsiveness of Hospital Stff

Pain Control

communication about medicines

Room and bathroom kept clean

Area around room quiet at night

Discharge information

Understanding your care after hospitalization

Overall Rating of Hospital

Would recommend this hospital

Pregnancy and Delivery Care

Pregnancy and Delivery Care

Early Elective Delivery

Best practices, as identified through medical studies by leaders in health care, can improve the chances for a safe, healthy delivery. These guidelines show that it is best to wait until the 39th week of pregnancy is completed to deliver your baby because important fetal development takes place in your baby's brain and lungs during the last few weeks of pregnancy.

Sometimes women go into early labor on their own, and early deliveries cannot be prevented. Sometimes, doctors decide that inducing labor or delivering a baby early by Caesarean Section (called "elective delivery") is in the best interest of the mother and the baby. In these cases, early deliveries are medically necessary.

However, doctors may also decide to induce labor or deliver babies by Caesarean Section early as a convenience to themselves or their patient. This practice is not recommended. Hospitals should work with doctors and patients to avoid early elective deliveries when they are not medically necessary.

Quality Measurements

In early 1999, The Joint Commission, an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies health care organizations and programs in the United States, solicited input from a wide variety of health care experts about core measures for hospitals. Simultaneously, The Joint Commission worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to align the measure specifications. The goal is to improve the health care delivery process. The Joint Commission has been a nationally recognized leader in performance measurement since the mid-1980s.

The Joint Commission's standardized performance measure is considered the "gold standard" in health care today. The Joint Commission has successfully developed and nationally implemented many sets of standardized core performance measures for hospitals. The measure data is publicly reported on the Joint Commission's web site at Quality Check. One of these measure groups is pregnancy and delivery care.

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Pregnancy and Delivery Care?

Percent of Elective deliveries with greater than 39 weeks gestation

This measure shows the percent of pregnant women who had elective deliveries one to three weeks early (either vaginally or by Caesarean Section) and whose early deliveries were not medically necessary. Lower numbers are better. Higher numbers may indicate that hospitals aren't doing enough to discourage this unsafe practice.

Stroke

What is a stroke?

A stroke is caused by blood vessels in the brain becoming blocked or bursting. When this happens, oxygen cannot get to the affected part of the brain. After more than three or four minutes, brain tissue begins to die.

Symptoms of a stroke can include:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, mainly on one side of the body
  • Sudden difficulty understanding or speaking—you may have slurred speech or confused speech
  • Sudden difficulty seeing in one eye or both eyes
  • Sudden loss of balance, coordination or the ability to walk
  • Sudden, severe headache

If you are experiencing symptoms such as these or think you may be having a stroke, call 9-1-1. Lifesaving treatment can begin as soon as paramedics arrive.

Quality Measurements

In early 1999, The Joint Commission, an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies health care organizations and programs in the United States, solicited input from a wide variety of health care experts about core measures for hospitals. Simultaneously, The Joint Commission worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to align the measure specifications. The goal is to improve the health care delivery process. The Joint Commission has been a nationally recognized leader in performance measurement since the mid-1980s.

The Joint Commission's standardized performance measure is considered the "gold standard" in health care today. The Joint Commission has successfully developed and nationally implemented many sets of standardized core performance measures for hospitals. The measure data is publicly reported on the Joint Commission's web site at Quality Check. One of these measure groups is stroke care.

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Stroke Care?

These scores tell you the percent of stroke patients who got each of the recommended and appropriate care* from the list below:

Stroke core measure components

  • Preventing Blood Clots—Medication or treatment to prevent blood clots in veins
  • Antithrombotic Therapy at Discharge—Antithrombotic (blood thinning) medication prescribed at discharge
  • Anticoagulation Therapy—Anticoagulant medication prescribed at discharge from the hospital
  • Antithrombotic Therapy by end of Second Hospital Day—Antithrombotic (blood thinning) medication given by the end of the second hospital day
  • Statin Medication at Discharge—A statin (cholesterol lowering) medication prescribed at discharge
  • Stroke education—Stroke education material provided before discharge
  • Assessed for Rehabilitation—Patients assessed for rehabilitation services

*Note: It may not be appropriate for every patient to receive each of these treatments.

This information is important because one way to tell if a hospital is doing a good job taking care of stroke patients is to look at how well the hospital provides the care listed above. Higher numbers are better.

Total Hip/Knee Replacement

What is a Total Hip or Total Knee Replacement?

Total hip replacement surgery is the procedure of choice for patients with debilitating arthritis of the hip. If your pain is persistent, you may want to discuss total hip replacement with your doctor. The primary goals of our hip surgery specialists are to treat your pain, restore motion and return you to your active lifestyle in a safe and comfortable fashion.

Total knee replacement surgery is the procedure of choice for patients with debilitating arthritis of the knee. It is a common operation (over 700,000 performed in the U.S. annually) with a very high success rate. It is important to remember that it is a major operation, and a thorough medical evaluation prior to surgery is required.

Quality Measurements

In early 1999, The Joint Commission, an independent, not-for-profit organization which accredits and certifies health care organizations and programs in the United States, solicited input from a wide variety of health care experts about core measures for hospitals. Simultaneously, The Joint Commission worked with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to align the measure specifications. The goal is to improve the health care delivery process. The Joint Commission has been a nationally recognized leader in performance measurement since the mid-1980s.

The Joint Commission's standardized performance measure is considered the "gold standard" in health care today. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare Health System has earned The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for our Joint Replacement Programs for Hips and Knees. Programs which receive this award demonstrate commitment to a higher standard of service. This recognition requires a rigorous onsite survey during which Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is evaluated for:

  • Compliance with consensus-based national standards of care for health care quality and safety in joint replacement
  • Effective and consistent use of appropriate, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for total joint replacement populations
  • Analysis of performance measures specific to total joint replacement

Indications of high quality Total Joint Replacement Programs include lower complication rates and shorter lengths of stay.

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Total Hip/Knee Replacement?

Overall Complication Rate

Lower complication rates demonstrate higher levels of safety. The median national complication rate is 3.5%. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare has a lower complication rate than the national median.

Average length of stay

Shorter lengths of stay may indicate superior post-surgical management leading to faster recovery. For the second quarter of 2016, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare had an overall length of stay of 1.6 days, much better than the national average of 4 days.

Weight Loss Surgery

What is Weight Loss Surgery?

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare's Weight Loss Surgery Program is designed to assist obese people in losing weight and improving their quality of life using bariatric surgery, plus dietary changes, exercise, education and behavior modification. Our staff members are experienced in working with obese patients and are truly compassionate and eager to help you reach your weight loss goal. The multidisciplinary team consists of three surgeons, a nurse practitioner, registered dietitians and clinical psychologists.

At Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare, we have been performing weight loss surgery since 2000. Almost all surgeries are performed laparoscopically, which means that surgical instruments are inserted into the abdomen through tiny incisions. This allows for minimal blood loss and more rapid recovery than traditional, open surgery. Most patients stay in the hospital only one or two nights and are back to work within a few weeks.

Weight loss varies depending upon which procedure is chosen. Most gastric bypass patients will lose approximately 70 to 75 percent of their excess body weight within one year. In the same time frame, sleeve gastrectomy patients typically lose 58 to 70 percent of excess weight. Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band (LAGB) patients will likely lose weight more gradually and less weight overall, but weight loss from all surgeries will improve your health and quality of life.

Many health problems are significantly improved or resolved after weight loss surgery. Most people who have type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, hypertension, reflux or heartburn (GERD), high cholesterol or joint pain will find they need less or no treatment with their post-surgery weight loss.

With weight loss and improved health, better quality of life usually follows. Most people enjoy tremendous improvement in their personal and professional lives.

Patients Reporting Improved Quality of Life

  • 94 percent improvement in physical activities
  • 92 percent improvement in self-esteem
  • 75 percent improvement in social life
  • 75 percent improvement in ability to work

Quality Measurements

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare Health System has been fully accredited by the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation Improvement Program for our Weight Loss Surgery Program. Programs which receive this award demonstrate commitment to a higher standard of service. This recognition requires a rigorous onsite survey during which Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is evaluated for:

  • Compliance with consensus-based national standards of care for health care quality and safety in weight loss surgery
  • Effective and consistent use of appropriate, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for weight loss surgery populations
  • Analysis of performance measures specific to weight loss surgery

How is Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare performing on Weight Loss Surgery?

30-day readmission rate

One measure of quality is lower 30-day readmission rates. Sometimes medical or surgical complications cannot be prevented. However, facilities which have superior post-surgical care and safer discharge processes will have lower rates of readmissions. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare has demonstrates a 30-Day readmission rate which is consistently better than the national average.

30-day reoperation rate

One measure of quality is lower 30-day re-operation rates. Sometimes medical or surgical complications cannot be prevented. However, facilities which have superior post-surgical care and safer discharge processes will have lower rates of re-operation. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare has demonstrates a 30-Day re-operation rate which is consistently better than the national average.

Average length of stay

Back to top